Skip to main content
Volume 5, No 3 - Summer 2005

Volume 5, No 3 - Summer 2005

Table of Contents

Colonoscopic Polypectomy Technique Update
Despite the frequency with which polypectomy is performed, there is a paucity of information on what technical aspects of polypectomy most effectively remove polyps and minimize complications. The practice of polypectomy is based largely on the observational experience of experts and what gastroenterology fellows have learned from their attending physicians and from experts in postgraduate courses. Moreover, polypectomy technique is not consistent across the United States. In this technique update, the author presents his own methods for treating and observing small, large pedunculated, and large sessile polyps and discusses the advantages, disadvantages, and complications of each technique. [Rev Gastroenterol Disord. 2005;5(3):115-125]
State of the Art: Extraesophageal Manifestations of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease State-of-the-Art Review
Although heartburn and regurgitation are the most common symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), several laryngeal, pharyngeal, and pulmonary symptoms, collectively known as laryngopharyngeal reflux, have also been associated with this disease. However, the case that GERD is the cause of these symptoms is difficult to make because neither endoscopy nor prolonged reflux monitoring has shown consistent evidence of either esophageal injury or abnormal reflux frequency. To date, there have been few controlled trials of antireflux therapy, and the data that are available are conflicting. Nevertheless, gastroenterologists are often confronted with difficult-to-manage patients with extraesophageal symptoms that are considered to be the result of GERD. This article reviews the current literature on this topic and discusses the author’s approach to treating these patients. [Rev Gastroenterol Disord. 2005;5(3):126-134]
New Drug Review Safety of Balsalazide Therapy in the Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Balsalazide is a mesalamine prodrug that is generally well tolerated and useful in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This review will focus on newer safety information regarding the use of balsalazide in the treatment of patients with IBD. In general, mesalamine compounds such as balsalazide are better tolerated than sulfasalazine. Balsalazide therapy should be avoided in patients with known hypersensitivity reaction to salicylates, mesalamine, other balsalazide metabolites, or the components of the Colazal® (Salix Pharmaceuticals; Morrisville, NC) capsule (silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate) but may be tolerated in patients who were unable to tolerate other mesalamine compounds for non-hypersensitivity reasons. Overall, balsalazide is well tolerated and effective in the treatment of IBD. [Rev Gastroenterol Disord. 2005;5(3):135-141]
New Drug Review Safety of Balsalazide Therapy in the Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Balsalazide is a mesalamine prodrug that is generally well tolerated and useful in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This review will focus on newer safety information regarding the use of balsalazide in the treatment of patients with IBD. In general, mesalamine compounds such as balsalazide are better tolerated than sulfasalazine. Balsalazide therapy should be avoided in patients with known hypersensitivity reaction to salicylates, mesalamine, other balsalazide metabolites, or the components of the Colazal® (Salix Pharmaceuticals; Morrisville, NC) capsule (silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate) but may be tolerated in patients who were unable to tolerate other mesalamine compounds for non-hypersensitivity reasons. Overall, balsalazide is well tolerated and effective in the treatment of IBD. [Rev Gastroenterol Disord. 2005;5(3):135-141]