Skip to main content
Volume 6, No 2 - 2013

Volume 6, No 2 - 2013

Table of Contents

Prevention of Early-Term Deliveries: Much Ado About Nothing?
[Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2013;6(2):43-45 doi: 10.3909/riog0602ed] © 2013 MedReviews®, LLC
Lingual Pyogenic Granuloma Gravidarum
[Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2013;6(2):46-47 doi: 10.3909/riog0209] © 2013 MedReviews®, LLC
Noninvasive Prenatal Testing: The Future Is Now Risk Assessment Review
This article reviews the various techniques being used to analyze cell-free DNA in the maternal circulation for the prenatal detection of chromosome abnormalities and the evidence in support of each. A number of areas of ongoing controversy are addressed, including the timing of maternal blood sampling, the need for genetic counseling, and the use of confirmatory invasive testing. Future applications for this technology are also reviewed. [Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2013;6(2):48-62 doi: 10.3909/riog0201] © 2013 MedReviews®, LLC
Prevention of Early-onset Neonatal Group B Streptococcal Disease Management Update
Streptococcus agalactiae, also known as Group B Streptococcus (GBS), is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of up to 50% of healthy adults and newborns; it is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Early detection can be used to establish the use of antibiotic prophylaxis to significantly reduce neonatal sepsis. This article reviews methods of detection and prevention of GBS infection in the neonate. [Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2013;6(2):63-68 doi: 10.3909/riog0218] © 2013 MedReviews®, LLC
Prevention of Early-onset Neonatal Group B Streptococcal Disease Management Update
Streptococcus agalactiae, also known as Group B Streptococcus (GBS), is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of up to 50% of healthy adults and newborns; it is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Early detection can be used to establish the use of antibiotic prophylaxis to significantly reduce neonatal sepsis. This article reviews methods of detection and prevention of GBS infection in the neonate. [Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2013;6(2):63-68 doi: 10.3909/riog0218] © 2013 MedReviews®, LLC
Uterine Vascular Lesions Management Update
Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. [Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2013;6(2):69-79 doi: 10.3909/riog0207] © 2013 MedReviews®, LLC
Global Endometrial Ablation in the Presence of Essure® Microinserts Treatment Update
Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) affects 30% of women at some time during their reproductive years and is one of the most common reasons a woman sees a gynecologist. Many women are turning to endometrial ablation to manage their AUB. This article reviews the data relating to the available endometrial ablation techniques performed with hysteroscopic sterilization, and focuses on data from patients who had Essure® (Conceptus, San Carlos, CA) coils placed prior to performance of endometrial ablation. Reviewed specifically are data regarding safety and efficacy of these two procedures when combined. Data submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration for the three devices currently approved are reviewed, as well as all published case series. Articles included were selected based on a PubMed search for endometrial ablation (also using the brand names of the different techniques currently available), hysteroscopic sterilization, and Essure. [Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2013;6(2):80-88 doi: 10.3909/riog0219] © 2013 MedReviews®, LLC
Preparing for Global Women’s Health Work Women's Health in the Developing World
Interest in global maternal health has steadily increased over the past decade. Medical schools are offering courses on this subject, residencies are incorporating international elective rotations into their practices, and retiring practitioners are opting to spend a year or two in low-resource settings. Although interest is growing, sometimes well-meaning health practitioners are not entirely prepared for their new experience. Prior to departure, a multistep process is necessary to prepare physicians for living and practicing overseas. [Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2013;6(2):89-92 doi: 10.3909/riog0225] © 2013 MedReviews®, LLC
News and Views From the Literature
[Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2013;6(2):93-96 doi 10.3909/riog0222] © 2013 MedReviews®, LLC
The Pink Pad—Pigazzi Patient Positioning System™ (Xodus Medical, New Kensington, PA)
[Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2013;6(2):97-98 doi: 10.3909/riogS13ProdReva] © 2013 MedReviews®, LLC
OVS1 HD Video System (Olive Medical Corporation, Salt Lake City, UT)
[Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2013;6(2):99-100 doi: 10.3909/riogS13ProdRevb] © 2013 MedReviews®, LLC
Sonicision™ Cordless Ultrasonic Dissection Device ( Covidien, Mansfield, MA)
<p>[Rev Obstet Gynecol. 2013;6(2):100-101 doi: 10.3909/riogS13ProdRevc] © 2013 MedReviews®, LLC</p>