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Urology

Volume 11, No 4 - Fall 2009

Volume 11, No 4 - Fall 2009

Table of Contents

Advances in the Medical Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia
In this KOL (key opinion leader) interview, Herbert Lepor, MD, co–Medical Editor of Reviews in Urology, discusses the medical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).[Rev Urol. 2009;11(4):181-184 doi: 10.3909/riu0477]© 2009 MedReviews®, LLC
The Impact of Prostate Cancer and Hormonal Therapy on Bone Management Review
Large-scale studies agree that the observed decline in prostate cancer mortality that began in the early 1990s, shortly after prostate-specific antigen testing was introduced in the United States, is most likely explained by more widespread treatment of prostate cancer, including hormonal therapy. Practitioners should be aware of the risk of the development of osteoporosis and of skeletal side effects related to hormonal therapy to optimize the care of men with prostate cancer.[Rev Urol. 2009;11(4):185-189 doi: 10.3909/riu0469]© 2009 MedReviews®, LLC
Skin Preparation for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection: Which Agent Is Best? Treatment Review
Procedural and surgical site infections create difficult and complex clinical scenarios. A source for pathogens is often thought to be the skin surface, making skin preparation at the time of the procedure critical. The most common skin preparation agents used today include products containing iodophors or chlorhexidine gluconate. Agents are further classified by whether they are aqueous-based or alcohol-based solutions. Traditional aqueous-based iodophors, such as povidone-iodine, are one of the few products that can be safely used on mucous membrane surfaces. Alcohol-based solutions are quick, sustained, and durable, with broader spectrum antimicrobial activity. These agents seem ideal for longer open surgeries with the potential for irrigation or surgical spillage, such as cystoprostatectomy, radical prostatectomy, and retroperitoneal lymph node dissection.[Rev Urol. 2009;11(4):190-195 doi: 10.3909/riu0467]© 2009 MedReviews®, LLC
Defining Efficacy in the Treatment of Overactive Bladder Syndrome Management Update
Patients seek treatment for overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) due to poor quality of life, and perceived improvement in quality of life (QOL) from medical therapy is multifactorial. Many feel that efficacy/success of medical therapy for OAB should not be linked to improvements in 1 or 2 endpoints, but instead should be linked to patient expectation and QOL improvement. Ideally, once patient-centered goals are defined, outcomes should be correlated with relief of symptom(s), patient satisfaction, and goal attainment expectations as a result of treatment.[Rev Urol. 2009;11(4):196-202 doi: 10.3909/riu0480]© 2009 MedReviews®, LLC
Focal Therapy: A New Paradigm for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer Treatment Update
Focal therapy has been proposed in recent years as a means of bridging the gap between radical prostatectomy and active surveillance for treatment of prostate cancer. The rationale for focal therapy comes from its success in treating other malignancies. One of the challenges in applying such an approach to the treatment of prostate cancer has been the multifocal nature of the disease. This review addresses the selection of potentially ideal candidates for focal therapy and discusses which modalities are currently being used and proposed for focal therapy. Setting and meeting guidelines for oncologic efficacy is a challenge we must embrace to safely deliver this potentially revolutionary approach to treating men with prostate cancer.[Rev Urol. 2009;11(4):203-212 doi: 10.3909/riu0475]© 2009 MedReviews®, LLC
Best of the 2008 Sexual Medicine Society of North America
Highlights From the Sexual Medicine Society of North America, October 16-19, 2008, Toronto, Ontario, Canada[Rev Urol. 2009;11(4):213-215 doi: 10.3909/riu0466]© 2009 MedReviews®, LLC
Concurrent Bilateral Renal Angiomyolipoma and Renal Cell Carcinoma in a Patient With Tuberous Sclerosis Complex
Renal angiomyolipomas (AMLs) are often associated with tuberous sclerosis. These tumors are predominantly benign, although malignant forms do exist and are known to be associated with renal cell carcinoma. This case report describes a patient with tuberous sclerosis and massive bilateral AML. Total right nephrectomy was performed; histopathologic examination revealed the coexistence of AML and clear cell renal carcinoma in the same kidney. Because differentiation between renal cell carcinoma and AML with minimal or no fat component can be difficult, an accurate diagnosis is critical in the management of renal AML.[Rev Urol. 2009;11(4):216-218 doi: 10.3909/riu0436]© 2009 MedReviews®, LLC
A New Journal Called LUTS: Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms
[Rev Urol. 2009;11(4):219-220 doi: 10.3909/riu0473]© 2009 MedReviews®, LLC