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Urology

Volume 9, No 2 - Spring 2007

Volume 9, No 2 - Spring 2007

Table of Contents

Understanding the Natural Biology of Kidney Cancer: Implications for Targeted Cancer Therapy Treatment Update
During the past several decades, there has been a significant increase in the understanding of the biology, clinical behavior, and prognostic factors of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Such progress has led to greater sophistication in the diagnosis and classification of RCC. Here, we review recent advances in our knowledge of the biologic characteristics of RCC that have resulted in notable achievements in staging, prognosis, patient selection, and treatment. [Rev Urol. 2007;9(2):47-56]
The Impact of Definitions of Failure on the Interpretation of Biochemical Recurrence Following Treatment of Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Diagnostic Update
Widespread early detection with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has radically transformed the clinical management of prostate cancer. PSA has become valuable in the monitoring and risk stratification of recurrent disease following local therapy. In many ways, biochemical recurrence–free survival, or PSA outcome, has become a surrogate measure of treatment efficacy following primary local therapy. Given the inherent differences in PSA kinetics following these treatment approaches, the definition of biochemical success or failure is not uniform among therapies. An appreciation of the inherent strengths, limitations, and biases of the standard definitions of failure can provide a more meaningful context within which to interpret the reported outcomes of different treatment modalities. [Rev Urol. 2007;9(2):57-62]
Management of Men Diagnosed With Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome Who Have Failed Traditional Management Management Update
For many patients, the traditional biomedical model that physicians have used to manage chronic prostatitis does not work. This article describes innovative treatment strategies for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, with an emphasis on novel biomedical physical therapy and biopsychosocial approaches to the management of individualized patient symptoms. [Rev Urol. 2007;9(2):63-72]
Phosphodiesterase Type 5 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Treatment Update
Both lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and erectile dysfunction have a very high prevalence among aging men, and there is some clinical evidence that they may share a common pathophysiology. Consequently, several preliminary studies of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors—sildenafil and tadalafil—have recently been conducted in men with concomitant erectile dysfunction and lower urinary tract symptoms to determine whether these agents are effective for the treatment of symptomatic BPH. These studies have demonstrated efficacy, both alone and in combination with an -blocker, in treating lower urinary tract symptoms along with sexual dysfunction. However, larger-scale randomized studies are necessary to determine long-term safety, efficacy, and cost effectiveness. [Rev Urol. 2007;9(2):73-77]
Urinary Tract Infections and Resistant Bacteria Meeting Review
Highlights of a Symposium at the Combined Meeting of the 25th International Congress of Chemotherapy (ICC) and the 17th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID), March 31-April 3, 2007, Munich, Germany [Rev Urol. 2007;9(2):78-80]
A Multidisciplinary Consensus Meeting on IC/PBS Meeting Review
Outcome of the Consensus Meeting on Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome, February 10, 2007, Washington, DC [Rev Urol. 2007;9(2):81-83]
Angiomyolipoma of the Left Ureterovesical Junction Case Review
Angiomyolipoma (AML) is a benign tumor that typically consists of 3 tissue elements: thick-walled blood vessels, smooth muscle cells, and adipocytes. The most common location for AML is renal; however, extrarenal AML has been described. Reports of extrarenal AML within the genitourinary tract are rare. We report a case of AML at the left ureterovesical junction and the evaluation and management decisions regarding this lesion. [Rev Urol. 2007;9(2):84-88]